The Art of Sake

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July 12, 2014 by MsDailyLife

Sake is an alcoholic beverage of Japanese origin that is made from fermented rice. Sake is sometimes called “rice wine” but the brewing process is more akin to beer, converting starch to sugar for the fermentation process, by using Aspergillus oryzae

The origin of sake is unclear. The earliest reference to the use of alcohol in Japan is recorded in the Book of Wei in the Records of the Three Kingdoms. This 3rd-century Chinese text speaks of the Japanese drinking and dancing. Bamforth (2005) noted that the probable origin of sake was in the Nara period (710–794 AD).

Sake is sometimes referred to in English-speaking countries as rice wine. However, unlike wine, in which alcohol (ethanol) is produced by fermenting sugar that is naturally present in grapes and other fruits, sake is produced by means of a brewing process more like that of beer. To make beer or sake, the sugar needed to produce ethanol must first be converted from starch.

The brewing process for sake differs from the process for beer, in that for beer, the conversion from starch to sugar and from sugar to alcohol occurs in two discrete steps. But when sake is brewed, these conversions occur simultaneously. Furthermore, the alcohol content differs between sake, wine, and beer. Wine generally contains 9%–16% ABV,while most beer contains 3%–9%, and undiluted sake contains 18%–20% (although this is often lowered to about 15% by diluting with water prior to bottling).

When the gold leaf floats softly within the sake, It means that spring has arrived in your sake cup. “Kotobuki no Kimpaku” (Gold Leaf of Longevity)

When the gold leaf floats softly within the sake,
It means that spring has arrived in your sake cup.
“Kotobuki no Kimpaku” (Gold Leaf of Longevity)

Kimpaku is used at festive occasions. This Kimpaku’s motif is cherry blossoms.

Thoughts of sake-making are strongly imbued within the “Manyouin” Guesthouse

Thoughts of sake-making
are strongly imbued within
the “Manyouin” Guesthouse

A taste clear as crystal, exquisitely expressed in a 300-milliliter bottle “SOIGNER”

A taste clear as crystal,
exquisitely expressed in a 300-milliliter bottle
“SOIGNER”

chocolate and sake!!

A 180-milliliter taste of an unfiltered junmai that even goes with chocolate “Kawasemi no Tabi” (“Journey of the Kingfisher”)

A 180-milliliter taste of an unfiltered junmai
that even goes with chocolate
“Kawasemi no Tabi” (“Journey of the Kingfisher”)

Finish your sake ready to arrange delicate flowers “Mannenyuki Chimpara Glass” (“Ten Thousand Years of Snow Marble Glass”)

Finish your sake ready
to arrange delicate flowers
“Mannenyuki Chimpara Glass” (“Ten Thousand Years of Snow Marble Glass”)

Fushimi has prospered as a brewery town. Even now many of its elegant buildings still remain to be enjoyed even if you’re just taking a stroll.

Fushimi has prospered as a brewery town. Even now many of its elegant buildings still remain to be enjoyed even if you’re just taking a stroll.

A 180 milliliter bottle packed full of the flavor and depth of rice “Kotsuzumi Elephant Label”

A 180 milliliter bottle packed
full of the flavor and depth of rice
“Kotsuzumi Elephant Label”

Developed in collaboration with  Italian chefs: “RISSIMO”

Developed in collaboration with
Italian chefs:
“RISSIMO”

“Niwa no Uguisu” (Garden Uguisu) A smooth sake with a lovely label featuring a Japanese bush warbler.

“Niwa no Uguisu” (Garden Uguisu)
A smooth sake with a lovely label
featuring a Japanese bush warbler.

The bush warbler is a bird that symbolizes spring in Japan.

“Karaku” (Flower of Kyoto)  A junmai daiginjō sake with  a fruity aroma and a gentle taste.

“Karaku” (Flower of Kyoto)
A junmai daiginjō sake with
a fruity aroma and a gentle taste.

You can sip this hanami sake quietly while at home, while wishing that the cherry bonsai would bloom every year.

You can sip this hanami sake
quietly while at home,
while wishing that the cherry bonsai would bloom every year.

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